Sify Ads - 728x90

ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White
ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

NO COPYING ALLOWED FROM THIS SITE

All the recipes and Photographs on this Site are old Family Recipes and tried and tested by the Author. Please feel free to try out these old recipes, and relish them, but desist from copying and using on other sites without the prior permission of Bridget White-Kumar. Any infringement would amount to Plagarism and infringement of Copy Right punishable by Law

Friday, December 21, 2007

ANGLO-INDIAN GINGER WINE

100 grams fresh ginger root
2 kgs sugar
6 limes / lemons (extract the juice)
3 pieces cinnamon
6 litres water

Peel and wash the ginger root and cut into thin strips. Put the ginger pieces, sugar and cinnamon together and bring to boil on high heat. Lower the heat, then simmer for atleast 2 hours on low heat till the water reduces and the mixture becomes slightly thick and coloured. Remove from heat then add the lime /lemon juice and mix well. When cold, strain through a thin cloth. Bottle and use as a digestive after all the heavy Christmas fare. This wine lasts for 3 months in a refrigerator.

GRAPE WINE

1 kg black sweet grapes

1 kg sugar

2 litres water

1/4 teaspoon baker's yeast

Wash the grapes we.. crush them well with the sugar. Add water and yeast and leave aside in a jar or a suitable vessel for 21 days. Open and stir the mixture every alternate day. After 21 days strain the mixture and leave aside for the sediments to settle. Strain once again then transfer to bottles.

To add more colour to the wine. Burn some sugar with a little rum / brandy/ wine in a saucepan. When the sugar gets caramelised add to the wine and mix well. It will then have a lovely rich colour.

Note: For making larger quantities of wine, increase the ingredients accordingly

COCONUT SWEETS (BARFI)

2 cups coconut scrapings

2 cups white sugar

1/2 cup milk

1 tablespoon butter or ghee

1/2 teaspoon vanilla essence

1/2 teaspoon pink or green food colouring

Take a thick bottomed vessel and heat the sugar and 1/4 cup water on high heat. When the sugar melts, add the coconut, vanilla essence, ghee / butter and the milk. Cook on medium heat stirring all the time till the mixture thickens and leaves the sides of the vessel. Drop a teaspoon of the mixture in a cup of water and if it forms a ball when rolled between the thumb and fingers, the right consistency is reached. Grease a flat plate and pour the mixture on it. Spread well and flatten with the back of a spoon dipped in water. Cut into squares when slightly cool.

Thursday, December 13, 2007

ANGLO-INDIAN DOLDOL (THOLE THOLE)

A SPECIAL ANGLO-INDIAN CHRISTMAS SWEET MADE WITH RICE FLOUR AND COCONUT MILK

INGREDIENTS
1 kg Sugar
500 grams Almonds chopped
300 grams find Semolina / Rava (Roasted lightly with a little ghee)
500 grams ghee or clarified butter
5 cups thick coconut milk extracted from 3 coconuts or 5 packs of ready coconut milk
1 kg Puttu Rice or Red Rice Flour

METHOD

In a fairly big vessel, boil the sugar and coconut milk together till it forms a syrup. Mix the Rice flour and Semolina together and add to the syrup a little at a time, stirring constantly. Add the ghee and almonds. Stirring continuously, keep cooking on low heat till the mixture is thick and leaves the sides of the pan. Remove from heat and pour onto a greased plate. Cut into squares when cold. The Doldol will be black in colour.

Monday, December 03, 2007

CHRISTMAS PUDDING


Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour

200 grams fresh bread crumbs
200 grams butter
2 teaspoons instant coffee (Nescafe or Bru)
2 teaspoons golden or caramel syrup
½ teaspoon baking powder
2 eggs beaten well
¼ cup rum
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon and cloves
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
100 grams raisins
100 grams chopped sultanas
100 grams mixed peel
½ teaspoon salt
100 grams sugar

Cream the butter and sugar together then add the eggs and mix well. Gradually add all the other ingredients and mix well. Grease a Pudding Mould or any suitable bowl with butter. Pour the pudding mixture into it then steam the pudding for about 1 hour on low heat till it is firm to touch.

Note: This pudding can be made in advance and refrigerated till required. Steam for 10 minute or microwave for 3 minutes before serving

CHOCOLATE BROWNIES

Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour

200 grams refined flour or maida
2 eggs
200 grams sugar
200 grams butter
A pinch of salt
2 tablespoons cocoa powder
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
2 tablespoons broken cashew nuts of walnuts

Beat the butter, sugar, eggs, salt, cocoa powder and vanilla essence together till creamy. Add the flour and mix well. If mixture is too thick add a little milk. Pour the mixture into a buttered and floured cake tin and sprinkle the broken cashew nuts or walnuts on the top. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes in a moderate oven. The top should be brown and crisp.

Sunday, December 02, 2007

ANGLO-INDIAN CHRISTMAS TREATS

ANGLO-INDIAN CHRISTMAS TREATS

KAL KALS (Fried sweetened balls of dough)
Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients

I kg refined flour or maida
6 eggs beaten well
2 cups thick coconut milk
½ teaspoon salt
300 grams sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
Oil for deep frying

Mix the flour, salt, sugar and baking powder together. Add the coconut milk and eggs and knead to a soft dough. Keep aside for an hour. Form kalkals by taking small lumps of the dough and roll on the back of a fork or a wooden kalkal mould, to form a scroll. Alternately, roll out the dough and cut into fancy shapes with kalkal or cookie cutters. Heat oil in a deep pan and fry as many kalkals as possible at a time. Keep aside.

To ice the kalkals, melt 1 cup of sugar with ½ cup of water and when the sugar syrup crystallizes pour over the kalkals and mix well. Store in airtight boxes when cold.

ROSE COOKIES
Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients

½ kg refined flour or maida
250 grams rice flour (optional)
1 cup coconut milk
200 grams sugar
6 eggs beaten well
½ teaspoon salt
1 litre oil for frying
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
1 teaspoon baking powder

Mix all the ingredients together to form a smooth slightly thick batter.
Heat oil in a deep pan till it reaches boiling point. Now place the rose cookie mould into the oil to get hot. When the mould is hot enough dip it half way only into the batter and put it back immediately into the boiling oil. Shake the mould to separate the cookie from it. Heat the mould again and repeat the process. Fry rose cookies till brown. Continue in this way till the batter is finished.

Note: The batter will stick to the rose cookie mould with a hissing sound only if it is sufficiently hot otherwise it will just slide off the mould

Monday, November 26, 2007

CHOCOLATE NUTTY FUDGE


Makes 24 pieces Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients

300 grams sugar
100 grams cocoa powder
1 cup milk
3 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
100 grams chopped walnuts and cashew nuts

Heat the milk in a suitable pan. When warm mix in the sugar, vanilla essence and cocoa powder. Simmer on low heat stirring continuously. When the mixture starts leaving the sides of the pan, add the butter and chopped nuts and mix well. Remove from heat and pour onto a greased plate. Cut into squares or diamond shapes when slightly cool

Friday, November 16, 2007

SIMPLE CHICKEN AND POTATO ROAST


Serves: 6
Preparation and cooking time: 1 hour

Ingredients

1 whole chicken jointed into 4 to 6 pieces
6 medium size potatoes peeled
3 large onions quartered
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon fresh chopped mint
1 teaspoon pepper powder
Salt to taste
1 teaspoon vinegar

Method

1. Wash the chicken and the potatoes.

2. Mix in all the above ingredients and leave aside for 15 minutes.

3. Arrange the marinated chicken and potatoes in a buttered oven proof dish.

4.Cover the dish with foil.

5. Bake in a moderate oven (355 degrees) for about 45 minutes.

Serve with Steamed vegetables and any type of bread.

Saturday, November 03, 2007

Article about my books in THE HINDU METRPLUS 3/11/07

Bridget White’s earlier books, “The Best of Anglo-Indian Cuisine – A Legacy”, “A Collection of Anglo Indian Roasts, Casseroles and Bakes”, and “Flavours of the Past”, were largely influenced by South In dian flavours. For her new book, “Anglo Indian Delicacies”, Bridget, born and brought up in Kolar Gold Fields, has included favourites from North India and Kolkata.

The book features old favourites such as pork bhooni, the Portuguese devil curry, which as the name suggests is fiery with chillies, and Fish Kedegeree, (an anglicised kitchri, a rice and lentil dish) among other things.

Bridget’s father, Sydney White, served in the REME during World War II and he would tell stories of his Army days and the glorious camp soup. The book includes regimental recipes such as camp soup, Bengal Lancers shrimp curry, one eyed Jack and boiled mutton chops. The recipes are simple and can be tried with easily available ingredients.

With the festive season upon us, the second book, “The Anglo Indian Festive Hamper” is just the ticket. The book is a collection of popular Anglo-Indian festive goodies such as cakes, sweets, puddings, sandwiches, preserves and home-made wines. The cakes section is exhaustive. From the rich plum cake to yule log, the walnut cake to the fruit mince pies, the list is endless. Then there are different kinds of icing. Besides, there are Easter eggs, hot cross buns, kalkals, rose cookies, marzipan, fritters, marshmallows, fudge, toffees, puddings, blancmange, cookies, pancakes, marmalades and preserves. These books are a sure way of surprising family and friends with a treat that’s easy to cook.

For copies contact Bridget at 0091 80 25504137 / +91 98455 71254
bridgetkumar@yahoo.com

Tuesday, October 30, 2007

TANGY FISH CURRY (FISH COOKED WITH TAMARIND


Serves 6 Preparation Time 45 minutes

1 kg good fleshy fish cut into slices
½ cup thick tamarind juice extracted from a lime size ball of tamarind
2 big onions chopped finely
2 tablespoons ginger garlic paste
½ cup ground coconut or 1 cup of coconut milk
3 teaspoons chilly powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
2 teaspoons coriander powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil

Wash the fish well and fry it lightly to make it firm. Heat the oil in a shallow vessel and fry the onions till golden brown. Add the ginger garlic paste, chilly powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder and a little water and fry well for some time. Add the coconut, salt, tamarind juice and some more water and bring to boil. Add the fish and cook for about 6 to 7 minutes till the fish is cooked. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves and slit green chilies

Friday, October 26, 2007

EGG VINDALOO


Serves 6 Preparation time 45 minutes

6 Hard boiled eggs shelled
2 onions chopped
2 teaspoons chilly powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
2 teaspoons ginger garlic paste
1 teaspoon cumin powder
½ cup tomato puree
2 pieces cinnamon
2 table spoons vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil

Heat oil in a pan and sauté the onions till golden brown. Add the ginger garlic paste and cinnamon fry for some time. Add the chilly powder, cumin powder, turmeric powder, sugar and tomato puree and fry till the oil separates from the masala. Now add the vinegar and a little water and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer till the gravy is sufficiently thick. Cut the boiled eggs into halves and carefully drop into the gravy. Simmer for a few minutes. Take out the egg halves and place on a serving dish. Pour the thick gravy over the eggs and shake the dish so that all the eggs are covered with the gravy. Serve hot.

Sunday, October 21, 2007

GREEN CHILLIE CHICKEN FRY

Serves 6 Preparation Time 1 hour
Ingredients

1 kg chicken cut into medium size pieces
1 teaspoon garlic paste
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon green chillie paste or Chillie sauce
1 teaspoon Vinegar
3 tablespoons oil or butter
2 teaspoons chopped green chillies
½ teaspoon tumeric powder
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
Salt to taste

Marinate the chicken with the salt, vinegar, turmeric powder, ginger, garlic, and chillie pastes and keep aside for 1 hour. Heat oil in a suitable pan and sauté the chopped garlic and green chillies for about 3 minutes. Add the marinated chicken and stir well. Stir fry for about 5 minutes till the chicken changes colour. Add a little water and simmer till the chicken is tender and the water dries up. Add one more spoon of oil or ghee and mix well. Serve with rice or bread. This can be served as a starter at parties as well.

Saturday, October 06, 2007

BANANA COCONUT FRITTERS

An all time favourite fruit delivered in an enchanting treat - Banana Coconut Fritters combines the lovely taste of Bananas and Coconut which everyone will enjoy!!!!

Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients

200 grams wheat flour
100 grams jaggery (powdered) or soft brown sugar
1 cup grated fresh coconut or 4 tablespoons desiccated coconut
2 eggs beaten
2 bananas mashed well (green skin variety)
½ teaspoon salt
oil for frying

Mix all the ingredients together to a thick smooth batter. Heat oil in a deep pan till smoky. Drop a tablespoon of the batter at a time into the hot oil and fry till golden brown.

Serve plain or with vanilla Icecream as a Tea time Treat.

Sunday, September 30, 2007

ANGLO-INDIAN FISH VINDALOO

Serves 6 Preparation Time 45 minutes

1 kg good fleshy fish cut into slices
2 medium sized onions chopped
2 teaspoons chilly powder
2 teaspoons cumin powder
2 teaspoons ginger garlic paste
2 tablespoons vinegar
Salt to taste
2 tomatoes pureed
2 tablespoons oil

Wash the fish well and lightly fry in a little oil till the pieces become firm. Heat oil in a pan and add the onions and fry till light brown. Add the ginger garlic paste and sauté for a while. Add the chilly powder, cumin powder, pepper powder, tomato puree and salt and fry for some time. Add the fish and the vinegar and mix well. Add a little more water and cook till the gravy is slightly thick.

(Slices of Shark fish can also be used in this recipe to make Shark Fish Vindaloo. However the pieces need not be fried before hand since shark meat is already firm)

Wednesday, September 05, 2007

GUAVA CHEESE

GUAVA CHEESE
6 ripe guavas preferably the pink variety
¾ cup sugar
50 grams unsalted butter
½ teaspoon vanilla essenceA drop of cochineal colouring

Wash and cut the guavas into quarters and boil them well in a little water till nice and soft. Mash well. Strain through a thin cloth and throw away the skin and seeds. Boil the strained thick juice with the sugar and keep on stirring till the mixture turns slightly thick. Add the butter, vanilla essence and cochineal. Simmer till nice and thick. Pour onto a buttered plate. Cut into squares when cold.

CHEESE BALLS

CHEESE BALLS

200 grams flour
1 cup milk
3 eggs beaten well
½ teaspoon salt
100 grams grated cheese
50 grams butter
½ teaspoon chilly powder
½ teaspoon pepper powder
½ teaspoon baking powder
Oil for frying

Mix all the ingredients (except the oil) together to form a soft dough. Heat oil in a pan till smoky. Make small balls (the size of large gooseberries) and drop them into the hot oil. Fry till crispy and golden brown. Drain and remove. Serve hot with mint chutney or tomato sauce.

Friday, August 17, 2007

Grandma’s Country Captain Chicken


Grandma’s Country Captain Chicken was a very popular dish during Colonial times. In those days, the poultry used in its preparation were authentic well-fed, homegrown country chickens, which would take at least 2 hours to cook over a firewood oven, but the curry when done, would be rich and delicious. Legend has it, that this wonderful curry dish was first prepared by the grandmother of a British Army Captain especially for her favourite Grandson using her own home grown Country Fowls. Hence the name Grandma’s Country Captain Chicken

Grandma’s Country Captain Chicken
Serves 6 Preparation Time 30 minutes

1 kg chicken cut into medium size pieces
3 large onions sliced finely
2 teaspoons chilly powder
1 teaspoon tumeric powder
2 tablespoons oil
salt to taste
2 tablespoons garlic paste
2 sticks cinnamon
4 cloves
2 cardamoms
6 or 8 whole pepper corns
1 Dry Red Chillie broken into bits
2 teaspoons chopped garlic

Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions and chopped garlic lightly. Add the chicken and mix in the garlic paste. Saute for about 5 minutes on medium heat. Add the chilly powder, tumeric powder, cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, red chillie, pepper corns and salt. Add ½ cup of water and cook till the chicken is tender and the gravy is quite thick.

Ps. This recipe can be adapted to meat as well. Left over Beef or Lamb Roast can be made into a delicious County Captain Fry or a cold meat curry if desired.

Wednesday, August 15, 2007

Chicken Jalfrazie

Jalfrazie is a sautéd dish, which can be prepared with meat, poultry, sea food etc.
The word “Jalfrazie” came from 2 words: “Jal” meaning “spicy or pungent” and “Frazie” meaning “Fried”. As in the case of almost all of our cuisine, which started out as insipid concoctions, in the days of the British Raj, the original “Jal Frezie” was bland and tasteless. The Colonial servants would fry up the leftover Christmas Turkey and Chicken Roasts with some pepper, chillies, etc., for Breakfast the next day. Over the years many more ingredients and spices were added to this dish to make it as spicy and delicious as it is today and it has become synonymous with the cuisine of West Bengal.
CHICKEN JALFRAZIE

Serves 6 Preparation Time 1 hour
Ingredients

1 kg Boneless Chicken cut into cubes
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
3 dry red chillies broken into bits
1 teaspoon garlic paste
1 teaspoon ginger paste
3 tomatoes chopped
2 onions sliced finely
1 teaspoon spice powder or garam masala powder
1 teaspoon peppercorns
3 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste

Heat oil in a suitable pan and add the cumin seeds. When they begin to splutter add the dry red chillies, onions and pepper corns and fry till golden brown. Add the chicken and sauté for a few minutes till it changes colour. Now add all the other ingredients and stir well. Simmer on low heat till the chicken is tender and the gravy is quite thick. Serve with rice, chapattis or bread.

Tuesday, August 14, 2007

Anglo-Indian Meat and Vegetable Stew

Serves 6 Preparation Time approx 1 hour
Ingredients

1 kg Beef or Mutton / Lamb cut into cubes
2 tablespoons oil
2 onions sliced finely
1 Bay leaf
4 or 5 cloves
6 or 8 peppercorns
3 cardamoms
2 pieces cinnamon
1 teaspoon garlic paste
1 teaspoon ginger paste
2 teaspoons flour
2 tomatoes chopped or pureed
2 carrots peeled and cut into pieces
1 cup shelled green peas
2 potatoes peeled and cut into cubes
1 cup cauliflower florets
½ cup beans cut into 1 inch pieces
2 green chillies slit
Salt to taste

Heat the oil in a pressure cooker or suitable pan. Add all the whole spices and fry lightly. Add the onions and fry till golden brown. Add the ginger paste, garlic paste and green chillies and fry for a few minutes. Add the tomato and fry till the oil separates. Now add the meat and stir fry for 5 more minutes. Next add the cut vegetables, salt and sufficient water and cook on high heat for 10 minutes. Release the steam and open the pressure cooker. Now add the flour mixed with a little water and mix well. Simmer for a few more minutes. Serve hot with Rice or bread

Sunday, August 12, 2007

ANGLO-INDIAN PEPPER CHOPS

Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour

½ kg good chops either mutton, beef or pork
2 large onions sliced fine
2 or 3 green chilies sliced lengthwise
3 tablespoons oil
2 teaspoons pepper powder
3 potatoes peeled and halved

Wash the chops and marinate them with the pepper powder, and salt for about 30 minutes. Heat oil in a large pan and sauté the onions and green chilies for a few minutes. Add the marinated chops and mix well. Simmer for a few minutes till the chops get firm. Add sufficient water and the potatoes and cook till the chops are done and the gravy dries up. Garnish with onion rings.

RAILWAY LAMB CURRY

Railway Lamb / Mutton Curry is a direct throw back to the days of the British Raj, when traveling by train was considered aristocratic. This very popular and slightly spicy dish was served in Railway Refreshment Rooms and on long distance trains, with Bread or Dinner Rolls. The curry was not too spicy keeping in mind the delicate palates of the British. It was also popular with the Railway staff who had to be on duty for long periods at a stretch. The vinegar or Tamarind juice used in its preparation would ensure that the curry would last for quite a few days and was an ideal accompaniment with rice as well. The recipe for this dish is sure to bring back some happy memories.

RAILWAY LAMB CURRY

Serves 6 Preparation Time 45 minutes

½ kg mutton or lamb cut into medium size pieces
6 peppercorns
2 big onions sliced
2 pieces cinnamon
2 cloves
2 cardamoms
8 to 10 curry leaves
4 red chilies broken into bits
1teaspoon chilly powder
1teaspoon ginger garlic paste
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons vinegar or ½ cup of tamarind juice

Wash the meat and mix it with the ginger garlic paste, salt and the chilly powder. Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions, curry leaves, red chillies and spices till golden brown. Add the meat and mix well. Fry for a few minutes. Add the vinegar / Tamarind juice and sufficient water and cook on medium heat till the meat is done. Keep frying till the gravy is thick and dark brown.

Thursday, August 09, 2007

A Tri-Colour Marble Cake to celebrate India's Independence

India will celebrate 60 years of independence on the 15th August 2007. On this Diamond Anniversary here's a Tri-Colour Marble Cake to celebrate the day.

250 grams refined flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
200 grams butter
200 grams sugar
4 tablespoons milk
A pinch of salt
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
3 eggs beaten well
¼ teaspoon orange food colour
¼ teaspoon green food colour


Sift the flour, salt and baking powder together. Cream the butter and sugar well. Gradually add the eggs and vanilla essence and mix well. Fold in the flour slowly. Add the milk if the mixture is too thick. Divide the mixture into 3 portions in separate bowls. Mix the orange food colour with a teaspoon of milk and add to one portion of the mixture and mix well. In the same way mix the green food colour with a teaspoon of milk and add to another portion of the cake mixture and mix well. Take a greased and papered cake tin or dish and pour the green portion of the mixture in to. Spread the mixture evenly. Next spread the plain portion of the mixture over the green layer and spread evenly. Lastly, spread the orange portion of the mixture over this plain layer and spread evenly. Care should be taken not to mix the colours. Bake the marble cake in a moderate oven for about 1 hour till done.

Saturday, July 28, 2007

The History of Vindaloo....Recipe for Pork Vindaloo and Coconut Rice


“Vindaloo” is derived from the Portugese word “Vinha De Alhos” i.e. from the 2 main ingredients in it, which were "Vinho", meaning wine or wine vinegar, and "Alhos", meaning garlic. It was originally a vinegar and garlic based watery stew made with pork or meat in Portugal. However after the Portugese introduced it in India, it was completely revamped with the addition of spices and chilies, and over the years it has become one of the spiciest and most popular curry dishes all over the world. Vindaloo is not as thick as a Korma and it does not have as much gravy as other curries. It also requires quite a lot of oil in its preparation and tastes wonderful if eaten a day or two after it is cooked since the vinegar and other flavours soak into the dish. The pungency of the dish can be reduced or increased according to taste by adding or lessening the chilly powder. However, care should be taken not to lose the vinegar flavour, because Vindaloo get its special taste only because of the vinegar in it. It can be prepared with meat, pork, poultry, seafood, also vegetables such as brinjals, potatoes, peas etc).

PORK VINDALOO

Serves 6 Preparation Time 45 minutes

1 kg pork cut into medium pieces
3 big onions slices finely
3 big tomatoes pureed
1 tablespoon cumin powder
½ teaspoon tumeric powder
1 teaspoon mustard powder
3 teaspoons chilly powder
2 teaspoons pepper powder
3 tablespoons ginger garlic paste
1 cup vinegar
3 tablespoons oil
1 sprig curry leaves
Salt to taste

Marinate the pork for about one hour with the salt, vinegar, chilly powder, cumin powder pepper powder, mustard powder, tumeric powder and ginger garlic paste.Heat oil in a pressure cooker and fry the curry leaves and onions till golden brown. Add the marinated pork and the tomato puree and keep frying for some time. Now add more water and pressure cook till the meat is well cooked. Serve hot with rice or bread

SAFFRON COCONUT RICE
Serves 6

1 pack of coconut milk diluted with water to get 4 cups of milk or 1 fresh coconut grated and milk extracted to get 4 cups of diluted milk
2 cups of Raw Rice or Basmati Rice
½ teaspoon tumeric powder or a few strands of saffronSalt to taste
4 tablespoons butter or ghee
3 cloves, 3 cardamoms, 3 pieces of cinnamon

Heat ghee in a large vessel or Rice cooker and fry the spices for a few minutes. Add the washed rice, salt, tumeric and 4 cups of coconut milk and cook till the rice is done.

Sunday, July 22, 2007

THE ANGLO-INDIAN FESTIVE HAMPER


THE ANGLO-INDIAN FESTIVE HAMPER is a collection of popular Anglo-Indian festive treats, such as Cakes, Sweets, Christmas goodies, Puddings, Sandwiches, Preserves, Home-made Wines, etc, etc. The repertoire is rich and quite vast and takes you on a sentimental and nostalgic trip of old forgotten delicacies. These mouth watering concoctions are a mix of both ‘European’ and ‘Indian’, thus making it a veritable “Anglo-Indian” Festive Hamper. The easy-to-follow directions make the preparation of these old, popular, mouth watering goodies, simple, enjoyable and problem-free.
For copies contact: bidkumar@gmail.com / bridgetkumar@yahoo.com

ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES


ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES is a collection of Recipes of popular vintage and contemporary Cuisine of Colonial India. Old favourites such as Pork Bhooni, Devil Pork Curry, Calcutta Cutlets, Fish Kedegeree, Double Onions Meat Curry, Camp Soup, Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry, Boiled Mutton chops, etc have been given a new lease of life. The recipes are simple and extremely easy to follow. The very names of the dishes will surely bring back nostalgic memories of by gone days to many. As with the earlier books, it will make a useful addition to a personal Anglo-Indian Recipe Collection.
Price per book including postage: India : Rs130.00, Australia: A$8.00,
Canada C$8.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00For copies contact: bidkumar@gmail.com / bridgetkumar@yahoo.com

A COLLECTION OF ANGLO-INDIAN ROASTS, CASSEROLES AND BAKES


A COLLECTION OF ANGLO-INDIAN ROASTS, CASSEROLES AND BAKES is a practical and easy guide to delectable cooking. The clear step-by-step instructions describe the preparation of a variety of easy to prepare Anglo-Indian Roasts, Casseroles and Bakes such as Shepherd’s Pie, Washerman’s Pie, Roast Chicken, Macaroni and Mince, etc. A few Vegetarian Bakes and casserole dishes are also featured.
Price per book including postage: India : Rs130.00, Australia: A$8.00,
Canada C$8.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00
For copies contact: bidkumar@gmail.com / bridgetkumar@yahoo.com

FLAVOURS OF THE PAST


FLAVOURS OF THE PAST features recipes of popular and well-loved dishes of Colonial times, such as Grandma’s Country Captain Chicken, Railway Mutton Curry, Madras Pork Curry. Dak Bungalow Curry, Stuffed Snake Coy Curry, Guava Cheese, Peanut Fudge, etc, which are sure to bring back nostalgic memories.
Price per book including postage: India : Rs130.00, Australia: A$8.00,
Canada C$8.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00For copies contact: bidkumar@gmail.com / bridgetkumar@yahoo.com

THE BEST OF ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE – A LEGACY


THE BEST OF ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE – A LEGACY is a unique collection of easy- to- follow Recipes of traditional as well as every day Anglo-Indian dishes, ranging from soups, fries, curries, rice dishes, Christmas treats etc., picking up plenty of hybrids along the way, including popular favourites like the different types of Pepper water, Ball Curry, Coconut Rice, Devil chutney etc A few home brewed wines are also included to round off the extensive flavours and tastes.
Price per book including postage: India : Rs130.00, Australia: A$8.00, Canada C$8.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00

Anglo-Indian Cuisine....A Small Introduction

Colonial Cuisine or Anglo-Indian Cuisine is a fusion of both western and Indian Cuisine. This cuisine evolved over many years as a result of reinventing and reinterpreting the old quintessentially western cuisine by assimilating and amalgamating ingredients and cooking techniques from all over the Indian sub-continent. Thus a completely new contemporary cuisine came into existence making it truly “Anglo” and “Indian” in nature, which was neither too bland nor too spicy, but with a distinctive flavour of its own. It became a direct reflection of the multi-cultural and hybrid heritage of the new colonial population.

Anglo-Indian Cuisine is a gourmet’s delight. It is the extremely unusual blend of both tastes that makes this cuisine so unique. Anglo-Indian Cuisine is mostly prepared using English spices such as Pepper, bay leaves, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, etc. Indian condiments such as chilies, cumin, coriander, tumeric, ginger, garlic etc, are also added in moderation. Yogurt and milk are also used in certain preparations to offset extra pungency.

The Word “GASTRONOMY” means “THE ART OF GOOD EATING” and this is very true of Anglo-Indian cuisine, which is an ART IN ITSELF. Many of the dishes have rhyming alliterative names like Doldol, kalkal, Ding- Ding, Posthole, etc. The very nomenclature of the dishes is unique and original, and synonymous only to the Anglo-Indian Community. It is a true reflection of both worlds where the spicy curry is given as much importance as the bland cutlets and roasts.